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El Diario Showcases 100 Years in Photos

September 26, 2013 5:35 pm Leave a comment By  | Via  
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The September 14, 1923 issue of La Prensa, the precursor of El Diario. (Photo via El Diario La Prensa)

The Sept. 14, 1923 issue of La Prensa, the precursor of El Diario. (Photo via El Diario-La Prensa)

El Diario-La Prensa, New York’s oldest and largest Spanish-language daily newspaper, is celebrating its 100th anniversary by sharing with New Yorkers archival photographs taken over several decades, reports Von Diaz in Feet in 2 Worlds.

The photographs capture news events, sports, Latino culture and everyday life in the Hispanic neighborhoods of the city. They offer perspectives unfamiliar to many non-Spanish speaking New Yorkers.

Latino fans celebrate after the Yankees make it to the World Series in 1996. (Photo via El Diario La Prensa)

Latino fans celebrate after the Yankees make it to the World Series in 1996. (Photo via El Diario-La Prensa)

“Despite the substantial and transformative presence of Latinos in New York since the 19th century, they remain largely ignored by English-language news; and when recognized, mostly confined to crime and illegal immigration stories,” said Frances Negrón-Muntaner, director of Columbia University’s Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Race [CSER].

Negrón-Muntaner is the curator of one of the exhibitions based on the collection, titled “The Raging 70s: Latino New York as Seen by El Diario’s Bolívar Arellano.”

Gov. Nelson Rockefeller and Marisol Malaret, the  first Miss Universe from Puerto Rico. (Photo via El Diario-La Prensa)

Gov. Nelson Rockefeller (right), Marisol Malaret (sitting), the first Miss Universe from Puerto Rico, and politician Herman Badillo ( left). (Photo via El Diario-La Prensa)

El Diario, in partnership with CSER and Columbia University’s Rare Books and Manuscripts Library, is preserving more than 5,000 photographs taken since its inception.

Archivists and historians at Colombia University will study the collection. They say the photographs provide an unprecedented wealth of information and chart the evolution of New York’s Latino community over the past century.

The centennial project’s manager Javier Gómez says there were some unexpected finds in the newspaper’s archives.

“We discovered the presence of images from Washington Heights and Bronx was overwhelming,” Gómez says. “And these images deserve to be seen.”

Four exhibitions will open across the city this month and next, beginning at the Columbia University Medical Center which got started last week, followed by the King Juan Carlos I Center of New York University that opened September 25, Hostos Community College (October 7) and the Center for Race and Ethnicity at Columbia University (October 8). Visit the El Diario Centennial website to learn more about upcoming exhibits.

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