Native American

Some of the 16-person cast of "Trail of Tears" (Photo by Ashley Marinaccio via Downtown Express)

Staging ‘America’s Original Sin’

History, Manhattan, Native American July 16, 2015 at 3:17 pm

Downtown Express attends a performance of the Rebel Theater Company production “Trail of Tears,” which takes a multicultural and satirical approach in its portrayal of the forced migration of Native Americans in 1838-1839.

Shinnecock native Matauqus Tarrant leads Ross School students in a dance during the Shinnecock Green Corn Festival that was held on the grounds of the Ross Lower School on Wednesday, 6/17/15

Learning the Ways of the Shinnecock Nation

Culture, Education, Long Island, Native American July 2, 2015 at 4:18 pm

Members of the Shinnecock Nation on Long Island guided students in learning about Native American culture, The Sag Harbor Express reports.

Native American Post-Modernism on Display

Native American Post-Modernism on Display

The “How to Catch an Eel and Grow Corn” exhibit showcases the best indigenous women artists in New York.

Chef Andrew Gerson at work. (Photo courtesy of Brooklyn Brewery via Brooklyn Daily)

A Taste of Nieuw Amsterdam

Brooklyn, Food, History, Native American, Western European April 8, 2015 at 3:41 pm

Brooklyn Brewery’s chef plans a Nieuw Amsterdam dinner for April 16 featuring old Dutch specialties along with Lenape clams, reports Brooklyn Daily.

A Pow Wow in Its 36th Year

A Pow Wow in Its 36th Year

Culture, Featured Posts, Native American, Queens, Video July 29, 2014 at 5:32 pm

Representatives of more than 40 Native American nations gathered in Queens for a dance competition.

Five books by Native writers provide another perspective to the stories that arise this time of year. (Book cover images via Indian Country Today)

Alternative Books to ‘So-Called’ 1st Thanksgiving

Culture, History, Native American November 22, 2013 at 12:39 pm

Just in time for Thanksgiving, Indian Country Today offers a list of children’s books from Native writers as told from their perspective, rather than the “feel-good” stories of Pilgrim and Indian bonding that line bookshelves this time of year.